Posts Tagged ‘Comedy’

tumblr_lv10giehNp1qzofn3While watching Jason Nash Is Married, you can’t shake a sense of déjà vu. At first, you might attribute it to the source material for the film, a web series that streamed on Atom.com bearing the exact same title, but the feeling of familiarity goes beyond having previously seen the characters in another format. Slowly, the realization comes that Jason Nash is Married shares DNA with innumerable situation comedies featuring a beleaguered father/husband character. You feel like you’ve seen it before because you have, in 23-minute bites called Make Room for Daddy, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Married With Children, or Home Improvement. Jason Nash Is Married could also be called Seinfeld 2.0 – same idea, newer media.

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Filth-the-movie-2100615So what are we to make of Filth? Is it a comedy as advertised, a crime pic focused on a murder investigation, or a drama about one man’s inner demons?

There are parts within the first stretch that are howlingly funny, and the movie starts as if it will earn a place as a paragon of bad taste alongside such entries as South Park: Bigger, Longer, and Uncut, Bad Santa, and Ted. James McAvoy portrays Detective Sergeant Bruce Robertson as if he were Denzel Washington in an uproarious redo of Training Day. Robertson’s the type that will coerce a minor into sex and then criticize her technique. He’s after a promotion to Inspector, and he handicaps his competition on the Edinburgh police force for the audience with the odds flashing up in a graphic on screen after he verbally skews each of them.

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witchingandbitching_01It’s a safe bet that filmmaker Álex de la Iglesia is in complete agreement with the famous Oscar Wilde quote: “Moderation is fatal. Nothing succeeds like excess.” No two sentences could better describe de la Iglesia’s approach in his latest film, Las brujas de Zugarramurdi (aka Witching and Bitching), a frenetic visual and linguistic exercise in the extreme. Over-the-top is the movie’s starting point, and the Spanish director is hellbent on ratcheting up the absurdity at every opportunity. While ultimately the film suffers from being too much of a good thing – a trim of about ten minutes from the 104-minute run time would be in order – the picture is so original, the cast so committed, and the production design so much fun that the experience is as irresistible as the English language title.

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